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Signs Your Paint Color is a Fail

09 February 2015

Selecting the color of a room can be an agonizing decision.  After all, painting is a long, smelly, tedious chore.  The idea of selecting a color that forces you to repeat the process sooner than you’d like can be gut wrenching.  Any time you change the color of a room, you’re impacting its overall appearance and the new look can take some getting used to.  Here are our top ways to tell if the color you painted is truly a flop and not just something that needs a couple days to get used to.

The Color Makes You Look Worse:  It’s imperative to select a color for bedrooms and bathrooms that are complimentary to your skin tone.  This is because these are the rooms that you typically get ready in.  If the color you select presents you in an unflattering way, it may be time to make a change.  The colors that help the most people look their best are those that play off of common skin tones such as peach, beige, tan and pink.

Your Lighting Concept is No Longer Enough: You know you’ve committed a faux pas when the only thing you changed about a room is the wall color and now suddenly, you find yourself needing to turn on lights more often than you used to.  In this case, the sin you’ve committed is painting a room too dark which will also make the space feel more cramped.  Rectify the situation keeping an accent wall of that color and painting the rest of the walls a lighter hue.

You Wear Your Sunglasses at Night: Figuratively, not literally!  However, if your new color has you shutting your blinds and dimming your lights you’ve taken it too far.  Before repainting all together, try a lower wattage lightbulb to see if you can make the problem go away.  However, you can void this lapse in judgment altogether by bringing several of the same paint sample cards home and hanging them on each of the walls in the room to see how you feel being surrounded by this color.  Better yet, buy a miniature sample can of the paint and apply to a small area of the wall to see how it looks and how you feel about it.

The Color Doesn’t Mesh With Your AccessoriesIt’s in your best interests to think of a room as a cohesive unit made of walls, light fixtures and furniture.  When updating the color of the walls, you’ve got to check and recheck that it will work with the components of the entire room.  Work backwards and make sure that the paint color matches furniture and flooring instead of forcing a color onto a wall that simply isn’t going to work.